Interviews


Jason Gray in Hours of Idleness - "A Photographer's Journey in St. Louis", William C. Hutton, Jr., 2010


Curated Exhibits


International Photography Hall of Fame, St. Louis MO 

- Decisive Moments: 20th Century Street Photography, St. Louis Shoots, February 7 - May 30, 2014

Juried Shows


Fractions Art Gallery, St. Charles MO

- Inner Fall, 2011

- Beyond The Lens VI, 2012

Old Orchard Gallery, Webster MO

- 33 July, 33 Artists, 2011

Nurturing Spirit Studio, St. Louis MO

- Seducing The Third Eye, 2009

Soulard Art Market, St. Louis Mo

- I See Music, 2008

- Spoked, 2009

Other Shows


Mint Hill Fine Arts Center, Mint Hill, NC

- The 2022 Annual Litaker Show

The Light Factory Photo Arts Center  Charlotte, NC

- 2018 Members' Show 

- 2020 Members’ Show

Washington University School of Medicine Arts Commission, St. Louis, MO

- Farrell Learning and Teaching Center

   . 2006 Art Show

   . 2007 Art Show

Olivette Parks & Recreation, Olivetti, MO

- 2006 Art Show

Featured On


- “A Time-Capsule House", ACCIDENTAL MYSTERIES

 - "HOLIDAYS: Your Holiday Pictures", William C. Hutton Jr., Le Journal DE LA Photographie

"Ode to My Trainers: How Artists Glorified their Shoes and Other Sole Sentiments", Tuesday's Art Blog in London, Momardi

- "The Luck Exhibit", LenScratch

- "The Flance House 1959", Mid-Century Modern Freak


An artist’s duty is to reflect the times.

Nina Simone

If you want to make photographs, all you do is point the camera at whatever you wish; click the shutter whenever you want. If you want to judge a good photograph, ask yourself: Is life like that? The answer must be yes and no, but mostly yes.” 

Charles Hebutt

when a photograph is interesting, it’s interesting because of the kind of photographic problem it states—which has to do with the... contest between content and form… in terms of content, you can make a problem for yourself… with certain subject matter… if you run into a monkey in some idiot context, automatically you’ve got a very real problem taking place in the photograph... how do you beat it?”

Garry Winogrand


"It has quite justly been said of him [Atget, who, around 1900, took photographs of deserted Paris streetsthat he photographed them like scenes of crime. The scene of a crime, too, is deserted; it is photographed for the purpose of establishing evidence. With Atget, photographs become standard evidence for historical occurrences, and acquire a hidden political significance. They demand a specific kind of approach; free-floating contemplation is not appropriate to them. They stir the viewer; he feels challenged by them in a new way.

Walter Benjamin, In “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction”


Using Format